Why Join Scouting?

The life lessons learned in Scouting form a foundation to embrace opportunity and overcome obstacles in life.

  • A fun and safe environment to learn and grow while developing interests and skills
  • Character building and development centered around good morals and values
  • The chance to learn life skills that help Scouts be successful adults and contributing members of society
  • Exciting outdoor experiences kids love like hiking, camping, mountain biking, and more

First off, we would like to say thank you. Thank you for your willingness to try out our great organization and all the fantastic benefits it has to offer your child. Scouting is about character development and having confidence in yourself to Be Prepared! The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is the largest youth organization in the U.S. with nearly 3 million youth members and 1.1 million registered adult leaders. These members make up the 122,582 local Scout units. Our program is a family program, one that we hope will become part of your family. Our goal is that you will come to enjoy Scouting just as much as your child. This page is designed to help you become familiar with Scouting and hopefully answer some questions you may have.

Have you Joined a Scouting Unit?

If not, there's a fast an easy website (www.beascout.org) where you can find a Scouting unit close to you!  There are programs for boys age 7 through 20, and for girls age 14 through 20.

  • Cub Scouts: Grades K - 5 (5 - 10 years old)
  • Scouts, BSA: Grades 6 - 12 (11 - 17 years old)
  • Venturing: 14 - 20 years old
  • Sea Scouting: 14 - 20 years old

Learning by doing is a hallmark of outdoor education. Unit meetings offer information and knowledge used on outdoor adventures. A leader may describe and demonstrate a Scouting skill at a meeting, but the way Scouts truly learn an outdoor skill is to do it themselves on a unit outing.

Scouting uses the patrol method to teach skills and values. Scouts elect their own patrol leader, and they learn quickly that by working together and sharing duties, the patrol can accomplish far more than any of its members could do alone. The patrol succeeds when every member of the patrol succeeds, and Scouts learn that good teamwork is the key to success.

Health and wellness is part of the outdoor experience. As Scouts hike, paddle, climb, bike, or ride, their muscles become toned and their aerobic capacity increases. When they work as a patrol to plan menus for their outings, they learn to purchase cost-effective ingredients to prepare flavorful and nutritious meals.

Service to others and good citizenship is learned through such outdoor activities as conservation projects, collecting food, building trails and shelters, and conducting community service projects that promote healthy living. Through helping other people, Scouts learn to appreciate how they can share themselves and their blessings to those in need. By giving service to benefit others, Scouts gain a sense of personal satisfaction.

Getting started as a new parent and leader:

Once you've joined Scouting, there are lots of resources available within your new Scouting group, in your local district (a geographic service area of several dozen Scouting groups), and through your Stonewall Jackson Area Council (the local Scouting entity, made up of twenty districts).  If you need help finding your local resources, please give us a call at 540.943.6675 or email us info@sjac-bsa.org.